How to Bet the Kentucky Derby: A Beginner’s Guide

Here’s a quick guide:

Exacta: You pick the two horses you think will come in first and second, in that order.

Trifecta: Pick the three horses you think will come in first, second, and third – in the right order.

Superfecta: You guessed it. It looks something like this: Vicar’s In Trouble (20-1).

Horses with a high first number (like 20-1 or 50-1) are considered unlikely to win the race. Conversely, betting on a horse with bad odds will pay out a lot of money if they do win. Like it’s name implies, the superfecta pays out big bucks if you manage to get it right.

Now it’s off to the races. Good luck racing fans!

You’ve got your mint julep and your fancy hat ready for the Kentucky Derby, but are you ready to place your bet on the horse you think will win?. If you’re in it for the thrill of victory alone (and not the money), he’s a good bet.

Betting on Your Picks: “I’ll take $2 to win on the four horse, please.”

In horse racing, you need to bet on what place the horse will come in. Horses with lower first number (10 and down) are considered top contenders.

Betting on a horse with good odds will not pay out much money if they win. If you’re not going to be in Louisville for the big day, you can head to your local racetrack or off-track betting outlet and place a bet there.

Picking a Horse

There are 20 horses in the field for the Kentucky Derby, though as of now only 19 will be running Saturday (#11 Hopportunity was “scratched.”) All the horses are 3-year-old male thoroughbreds, which means they’re young horses with lots of talent that is still developing and not a ton of experience.

Many casual bettors will pick a horse based on name or looks, but there are better ways to judge the odds for whether a horse has a shot at winning. You’re trying to hit the sweet spot: a horse with okay odds who you think has a shot at winning.

The favorite going into this weekend is California Chrome, with 5-2 odds. Say, “I’ll bet $2 on (horse’s name or number) to win.”

If you’re done with the beginner stage of betting, you can up your odds of winning by doing more complicated bets that yield bigger payouts: exactas, trifectas, and superfectas. The words “first, second, and third,” are replaced by “win, place, and show.” If you think your horse is pretty good but not going to come in first, you can bet that he will “place,” — that is, come in first or second. Or you can bet that he will “show,” — that is, come in first, second, or third. You can place your bet anytime up until about 20 minutes before the race goes off at 6:24 p.m. Each horse will have a record of recent races he’s run, what place he finished, and how far ahead of the other horses he was. He’s dominated all the races he’s run so far and all eyes will be on him. Give that a good look to see who’s done well recently.

Look for a horse that has won most of his races by a good length. A horse that goes into the race with 50-1 odds but comes in first place will pay out the most money to the bettor. The Kentucky Derby is one and a quarter miles long, longer than any race these horses have run before, so the winner will need stamina.

Odds and Favorites

When you look at a race form there will be a number in parentheses after each horse’s name. Therefore, betting on him won’t yield a big payout.

Like all sports, horse racing has its own language that can be confusing to casual watchers. For a superfecta you pick the top four finishers in the right order. If your horse comes in any of those positions, you’ll get money.

If you’re sure you’ve got the winner and you only want to place a simple bet for him to come in first, go ahead and bet your money that way. Saturday. What’s a superfecta anyway, and how do you bet one?

Here’s our guide to making sense of the Run for the Roses. That number shows what the odds are that the horse will win

Artificial intelligence: Key to ​Kentucky Derby betting?

In a recent 60 Minutes/Vanity Fair poll, more than half of Americans (53 percent) called society’s quest to advance the field of artificial intelligence “important.”

1. How does the system work? According to the company, the technology is built on a closed-loop system inspired by the insect swarm found in nature. Gun Runner

4. The participants then used UNU to predict the winning order — and it turned out to be 100 percent correct. For comparison, none of the experts at Churchill Downs predicted the top four horses, let alone the top four horses in the correct order.

The artificial intelligence company Unanimous tested its new software platform, UNU, on last weekend’s Kentucky Derby, as reported by TechRepublic. .

In a statement, Unanimous’ chief information officer David Baltaxe said the whole process took the company’s AI tool 20 minutes.

2. Twenty participants, convened by the company, first used the software to narrow the field of 20 horses down to four top picks. Nyquist

“I placed my $1 bet on the race at the Derby on Saturday and made $542.10 — the odds of winning the superfecta [the top 4 finishers in order] were 540-1,” TechRepublic reporter Hope Reese wrote. The idea is that “many minds are better than one,” therefore the act of pooling individual insights gives groups a better chance of reaching optimal decisions.

© 2016 CBS Interactive Inc.

Although several prominent industry leaders remain wary of artificial intelligence, and a recent high-profile experiment with it went awry, the technology could revolutionize everything from smartphones to automobiles. Mohaymen

You probably didn’t consider basing your Kentucky Derby bets on artificial intelligence — but maybe you should have. All Rights Reserved. Exaggerator

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Movie Review – The Sting with Robert Redford and Paul Newman (1973)

J.

A Tip on a Horse Race

All hell broke loose.  The FBI was involved and the corrupt policeman, Lieutenant Snyder was also there.  Gunfire was part of the action.  The ending, the “Real Sting,” will not be revealed here.  It was such a fun movie to watch.  It has never lost its charm, and its equal has never been seen on the screen.

In order to lure Doyle Lonnegan to the betting parlor, Gondorff planned to join Lonnegan at his private poker party which he held on the 20th Century Limited train as it traveled between New York and Chicago.  Gondorff won $15,000.

 

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Background

“The Sting” was nominated for ten Oscars and won seven, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay.  In addition, Scott Joplin’s song “The Entertainer” was used as the theme music in the film.  Pianist Marvin Hamlisch’s adaptation of the song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song Score and Adaptation.  It triggered a revival of Scott Joplin’s music which was written in the first decade of the 20th Century.

Lonnegan and his henchman Floyd showed up at the betting parlor.  The games had begun.  J.  In the first game, Lonnegan raised with two pair, but Gondorff beat him by showing three tens.  Gondorff was able to get a seat at Doyle’s private table, and introduced himself as Shaw.  Henry Gondorff’s girlfriend Billie (Eileen Brennan) was on the train and managed to steal Doyle Lonnegan’s wallet containing $20,000, and to drop it in Hooker’s lap as she passed through his car.  In the second game, Lonnegan’s bodyguard Floyd somehow managed to stack the deck of cards in order to give Lonnegan four 9’s and give Gondorff four 3’s which caused both of them to build up the pot.  When Gondorff showed his hand, though, he had four jacks, beating Lonnegan’s four 9’s, infuriating the other cheater. Singleton (Ray Walston) was the caller, set up in another room to simulate the real thing.  Lonnegan handed the teller his 500 grand, betting on “Lucky Dan” to win.  When the race was over, “Lucky Dan” came in second rather than first.  The caller at Klein’s Drug Store had told him to “place” his money on “Lucky Dan,” which meant to bet that the horse would come in second.  Lonnegan did not understand the subtle instruction.

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                                                                Paul Newman – Wikimedia

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Now that he had Lonnegan’s trust, Hooker invited him back to the betting parlor, where Lonnegan brought $500,000, which at 4:1 would make him two million dollars on a race that had already been run.  At Klein’s Drug Store, Lonnegan got the phone call telling him to place his money on “Lucky Dan” in the 3rd race at Riverside Park.

When Lonnegan showed up at Klein’s, Hooker (Kelly) told him a guy would call the pay phone at Klein’s and would give him the name of a horse to bet.  Hooker gave Lonnegan $2000 to bet on the horse.  The phone caller told Lonnegan to play Blue Note to win the 5th race at Narraganset.  He came with his “apes” to the betting parlor and placed his bet.  Blue Note won by a nose and paid 7 to 1.

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The Big Con

This classic film has a complicated, yet refreshing, story to tell.  It helps if you know the game of Poker and the language of the confidence man, such as his calling his target or patsy “the mark.”  These episodes keep you on your toes and add to the enjoyment of this spectacular film.

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Hooker’s Life is in Danger

Introduction

                                                            $1000 Bill – Wikimedia

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Gondorff Gets a Seat at the Poker Table

                                                        Eileen Brennan – Wikimedia

When he met Henry Gondorff, Hooker learned about an elaborate scheme which Henry has used in which he sets up a phony betting parlor with a phony caller relaying the races and their outcomes that are occurring throughout the country.  Through the help of an insider at the Western Union office, the fake betting parlor received the results before the rest of the world, and was able to pass the information on to special customers of the betting parlor.  A group of men who were friends of Luther played the staff and customers of the betting parlor.

“Lucky Dan” Came in Second

We are first introduced to grafter Johnny Hooker (Robert Redford) who worked closely with his friend and mentor Luther Coleman (Robert Earl Jones).  They managed to fleece a character of $11,000, which confirmed Luther’s decision to retire from the con game.  He recommended that Hooker should meet Henry Gondorff in Chicago who would introduce him to the “Big Con.”  Regrettably, the man they fleeced was a henchman of crime boss Doyle Lonnegan (Robert Shaw).  A corrupt police officer, Lieutenant William Snyder (Chares Durning) was a friend of Lonnegan and demanded that Hooker return the $11,000.  When Johnny Hooker gave him an envelope filled with toilet paper rather than paper money, Lonnegan had Luther Coleman murdered in revenge.  Hooker left town and went to Chicago to look up Henry Gondorff.

The night before the Sting, Hooker visited a waitress named Loretta at her apartment.  The next day, she approached him on the street and was shocked when a black-gloved man appeared and shot the waitress.  He informed Hooker that Loretta had a gun and was about to shoot him, but Gondorff had hired the black-gloved man to look after Hooker.

“The Sting” reunited Robert Redford and Paul Newman who starred in “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” four years previously.  They act so well together; sometimes it just takes a nod, a wink, or a smile to bring each other’s character to life.

                                                          Robert Redford – Wikimedia

Hooker Befriends Lonnegan

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When Gondorff left the game, Hooker was able to get his seat at Lonnegan’s table, and introduced himself as Kelly.  He made up a story and told Lonnegan that he wanted to take over Shaw’s operation and could use Lonnegan’s help in doing so.  Kelly told Lonnegan that Shaw had his $20,000 because he sent a woman to steal his wallet.  Kelly had a plan to get Lonnegan’s money back.  Lonnegan agreed to meet Kelly at Klein’s Drug Store the next day.